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Jar with lid, with overglaze enamel design of flowers and plants c. 1660-1680
Kakiemon Kiln Collection

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Hexagonal jar with overglaze enamel design of birds and flowers c. 1670-1690
Kakiemon Kiln Collection

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Hexagonal bottle with overglaze enamel design of chrysanthemums and peonies c. 1670-1690
Kakiemon Kiln Collection

1-04

Square vase with overglaze enamel design of birds and flowers Late 17th century
Sakaida Family Collection

1-05

Octagonal dish with overglaze enamel design of quail and ripe millet c. 1670-1690
Sakaida Family Collection

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Hexagonal dish with overglaze enamel design of Sima Guang breaking the water jar c. 1670-1690
Sakaida Family Collection

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Lobed dish with overglaze enamel design of plum blossoms and chrysanthemums c. 1670-1690
Kakiemon Kiln Collection

1-08

Dish with overglaze enamel design of butterfly and chrysanthemum hedge Genroku era (1688-1704)
Sakaida Family Collection

1-09

Bowl with fluted rim, with overglaze enamel design of plums and pomegranates c. 1670-1690
Kakiemon Kiln Collection

1-10

Peacock-shaped plate with blue-and-white design of a peacock c. 1660-1680
Kakiemon Kiln Collection

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Chrysanthemum petal-like fluted dish, with overglaze enamel design of bird and plum branches c. 1670-1690
Sakaida Family Collection

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Figure of a married woman with overglaze enamels c. 1670-1690
Kakiemon Kiln Collection

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Figure of a cockerel with overglaze enamels c. 1660-1690
Collection of Kakiemon Foundation, Japan

1-14

Sake carafe, with overglaze enamel design of grapes and squirrels c. 1670-1690
Sakaida Family Collection

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Ewer with metal fittings, with overglaze enamel design of a landscape c. 1660-1680
Sakaida Family Collection

1-16

Jar with metal fittings, with overglaze enamel design of chrysanthemum blossoms c.1670-1690
Kakiemon Kiln Collection

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1. The Aesthetics of Kakiemon (early Edo period)

In the 1610s, the first Japanese porcelain was produced in the village of Arita in Bizen province, followed about 30 years later by the first generation Kakiemon’s success in firing porcelain with overglaze enamels. The earliest Kakiemon wares are characterized by the deep tones of the overglaze paint.

In the 1670s, responding to high demand from the Dutch East India Company, which handled all overseas exports, overglazed porcelains and other Kakiemon-style porcelains were produced to even higher quality standards. Ethereal designs were painted in an uncrowded way that allowed the beauty of the underlying milky white background to be fully appreciated.

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